Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)
$1,242.00

Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (19th Century - Edo Period)

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Japanese Tansu Storage Chest (Edo Period - 19th Century). Tansu are traditional portable wooden storage chests from Japan. In Japanese traditional houses, there were no fixed chairs, tables, or pieces of furniture in the living space. Tansu were intended as mobile cabinetry, and used to keep objects of daily use, clothes, and personal items. They were also frequently employed by shopkeepers to store inventory, records, or valuables, as well as in warehouses, and even on ships for the personal use of the captain or owner. In Japan, rather than being considered as decorative centrepieces to be put on display, these were merely functional storage items, often tucked away under closet spaces, behind sliding doors, and even in the pantry area. Since tansu from the Edo period were often placed in common areas where it was customary to sit on tatami mats rather than chairs, the tansu were made to fit into the alcoves of sliding doors or on top of the tatami mats themselves. Consequentially, they were the perfect height to be used by someone kneeling or sitting on the ground. The later Meiji era brought with it a sudden influx of Western culture, ideas, and items. As the use of western-style chairs became more and more widespread, tansu had to adapt to fit this lifestyle change and were thus lifted off the ground for easier use while sitting in a chair (Ref: Catrina Sugita). This piece was acquired in Tokyo in the mid 1990s. It is in fair overall condition with much vintage character while presenting chips, cracks (Including one in the back centre), some holes and blemishes. The metal work is in good condition. To buy a piece such as this it is important to embrace the principle of wabi-sabi. Wabi refers to the kind of beauty found in asymmetrical, uneven or unbalanced things. The asymmetry of a ceramic bowl is an example of wabi. Sabi is the beauty of aged things and speaks to the impermanence of life through the passage of time. There are no keys but all drawers open and close freely (not withstanding the photos). Please enjoy the many photos accompanying this listing. Upon request a video will be provided.

*Please contact us to obtain a shipping quote.

Dimensions:

H 57 cm / 22.4"

W 63.5 cm / 25"

D 33 cm / 13"

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Visiting us

Our private showroom is located in London, SE16, near Canada Water Underground station. If you'd like to see a particular piece in person, please contact us to arrange a viewing appointment. In the case of high-value items, BIA may be able to convey them to your home to facilitate a viewing in your own space. This applies to London post codes only.