'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)
£680

'The Port of Nice' by Alfred Salvignol (1951)

Alfred Salvignol

Fine Art

SKU 1196

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'The Port of Nice', pastel on paper, by Alfred Salvignol (1951). The simple boats and maritime cranes in this painting belie the glamour normally associated with Nice and the French Riviera in general. In this depiction, a fisherman or port worker ties up his boat to the simple mooring after the day's work. Even as recently as the 1950s, the French towns and villages along the Riviera were working ports as well as tourist destinations. In the late 1800s a railway line was built linking Nice with the rest of Europe. Once the grand hotels and casinos were established, the rich and regal began flooding in from across the continent and beyond. A bevy of artists, authors, creative and cultural figures came on their heels, particularly during the years between the First and Second World Wars, when wealthy American couple Gerald and Sara Murphy hosted the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Cole Porter, Rudolph Valentino, Dorothy Parker, John Dos Passos and Pablo Picasso. Longtime Cap Ferrat resident Somerset Maugham, who coined the memorable description of the Riviera as “a sunny place for shady people,” wrote in his autobiographical novel, The Razor’s Edge, “The shores of the Mediterranean were littered with royals, lured by the climate, or in exile, or escaping a scandalous past or unsuitable marriage.” This painting is a world apart from theirs and in its simplicity lies its beauty. The masterful execution of the work is something to behold. It is in good condition, newly framed and glazed and is signed by the artist in the lower right hand corner with the year, '51'. Upon request a video of the artwork may be provided.

About the artist: Alfred Salvignol was born in the late 19th century and worked well into the 20th. He is best known for his works of Mediterranean ports, particularly Nice. His art frequently is the object of spirited bidding at prominent European auction houses. 

Dimensions with frame:

H 51 cm / 20.1"

W 61.5 cm / 24.2"

Dimensions without frame:

H 45.5 cm / 17.9"

W 36 cm / 14.2"

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